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Many changes have been made in the new legislation that will affect nearly every taxpayer. So, as you prepare to file your 2018 taxes, we want you to understand the new tax reform laws. You’ll have more confidence as you file when you know how you’ll be impacted by the new tax provisions. Below are several categories that have been adjusted in the bill and how these changes will affect you.


As you prepare to file your taxes, the process can feel overwhelming. At Ingram, Wallis & Company, we want to help make your filing experience as simple and pain-free as possible, so we’ve created a list of most of the forms you need to gather before you file. Please note that every form and category may not apply to you. This is simply a guide to help you collect the correct information.


At Ingram Wallis, we provide a number of top-notch services that can greatly aid you or your business in getting your finances in order. At the core of these services are our taxes, consulting, and accounting services provided by our world-class staff of Certified Public Accountants.

Although we offer several useful accounting services from general ledgers and booking to computerized payroll services, and consulting services ranging from software selection and implementation to financial and retirement decisions, we are ready to help our clients take a step further with our wide range of tax services. With tax season upon us, we strive to provide financial information to our clients in a timely and accurate manner. This commitment is comprised of maintaining meaningful, well-organized financial records that can set up your business for success.


The relationship between accountant and client isn’t based on money; it’s based on trust.  There’s an invaluable connection from “Who do you trust with your finances?” to “Who do you trust with your future?” or “Who do you trust with your family?” At Ingram Wallis, our day-to-day operations and actions revolve around this central idea of trust. It’s a foundation that drives us to remain client-centered; we value the trust our clients place in us and set out each day to return on their investment with insight, counsel, guidance, accuracy, innovative services, and an ever-evolving portfolio of products. Our expansive accounting and auditing services, which are founded upon trustworthy client relationships, has allowed our dedicated staff of Certified Public Accountants to achieve innovative, efficient, and profitable financial solutions for our clients.


Thank you for voting Ingram, Wallis, & Company, P.C. as the 2018 Readers’ Choice for “Best Tax Service” and “Best Accountant/Tax Professional.” After receiving this recognition in each individual category in previous years, we are extremely honored to receive recognition for both categories in the same year. We truly appreciate the support from all of our clients and friends who voted for us and look forward to being the trusted source for all of your accounting and tax needs in the years to come.


New IRS guidance fills in several more pieces of the Code Sec. 199A passthrough deduction puzzle. Taxpayers can generally rely on all of these new final and proposed rules.


The IRS has issued interim guidance on the excise tax payable by exempt organizations on remuneration in excess of $1 million and any excess parachute payments made to certain highly compensated current and former employees in the tax year. The excise tax imposed by Code Sec. 4960 is equal to the maximum corporate tax rate on income (currently 21 percent).


The IRS has provided safe harbors for business entities to deduct certain payments made to a charitable organization in exchange for a state or local tax (SALT) credit. A business entity may deduct the payments as an ordinary and necessary business expenses under Code Sec. 162 if made for a business purpose. Proposed regulations that limit the charitable contribution deduction do not affect the deduction as a business expense.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations for determining the inclusion under Code Sec. 965 of a U.S. shareholder of a foreign corporation with post-1986 accumulated deferred foreign income. Code Sec. 965 imposes a "transition tax" on the inclusion. The final regulations retain the basic approach and structure of the proposed regulations, with certain changes.


The IRS has issued its annual revisions to the general procedures for ruling requests, technical memoranda, determination letters, and user fees, as well as areas on which the Associate Chief Counsel offices will not rule. The revised procedures are generally effective January 2, 2019.